Skip to main content

Full text of "Wellesley news"

See other formats


COLLEGE 




Vol. 2. No. 26. 



y\EW>5 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 1903. 



Price, 5 Cents. 



A New Employment for Women. 

"A new employment for women ' ' — 
the subject will always arouse curiosity 
and interest, and both were stirred in Mrs. 
Wheeler's audience last Friday evening. 
Mrs. Wheeler was the guest of the Econo- 
inics Club and sptke informally and in 
detail of the character and field of her own 
work, the work of a "Social Secretary." 

The title of office is not self explanatory. 
What is a "Social Secretary?" Briefly, 
she is the intermediary between the em- 
ployer and the emoloyee, who in the 
present organization of the large industrial 
establishment have lost the old personal 
relationship of master and servant and 
are become as strangers to each other, 
neither of whom is in a position to under- 
stand or appreciate the other's point of 
view. It is this fact of separation that is 
largely responsible lor constant niisundei" 
standings, irritation and antagonisms, for 
unde:iirable conditions of labor of which the 
head of a firm is often i^iorant, for the ap- 
parent indifference of employees to efforts 
made by employers to furnish them special 
comforts or opportunities. The institu- 
tion of a Social Secretaryship is an attempt 
to bridge this gulf. To the general man- 
agement she represents the worker, condi- 
tions, needs, desires, point of view; to the 
worker she shows th^ employer interested 
in his social and economic well being. 

The work of a Social Secretary, there- 
fore, takes on much the aspects of that of a 
social settleme.nt worker. Her task is to 
study actual conditions, to learn needs, 
and to become personally acquainted; 
then tc recommend such improvements or 
measures as seem necessaiy or desirable 
and not economically disadvantageous, 
for it must be remembered that the ofifice 
has been established upon the sound 
economic theory that friction in the labor 
element is as wasteftd as friction in any 
other part of the industrial machine. 

Her actual work may be indicated if not 
defined. She will have charge of the 
lunch room, reading room, rest room or 
other provision for the comfort of employ- 
ees. Their condition of health will be a 



chief concern, and she must secure sani- 
tary conditions of work and medical at- 
tendance for those who fall ill. Illness 
furnishes also an opportunity of visiting a 
girl in her home and of coming into more 
personal and friendly relations. Again 
the Social Secretary will form classes or 
clubs among the women as a means of 
indirect instruction and of creating the 
desired social atmosphere. As she gains 
more and more the confidence and fiiend- 
ship of her little community, her oppor- 
tunity for helpfulness becomes indefinitely 
great. 

Tact and sympathy, a versatility that 
can meet emergencies and take advantage 
of every opening offered, sound nidgment 
and good common sense are the rare com- 
bination of virtues demanded by this 
"new employment for women." 

Mrs. Wheeler, the pioneer in this field, 
has already been followed by others in 
several large stores in New York and else- 
where, and their success has been so 
marked in its economic as well as its social 
advantages that there seems no question 
of the future of the office. S. S. W. 



This double line moved out of College Hall, 
still keeping the President in their midst, 
and ran across the campus to their class 
tree, beyond the chapel. Here they 
formed in a circle, and sang and danced 
around the class tree, winding up with 
kisty cheers for 1904 and 1904's Senior 
President. Then once more the triumphal 
procession started on its way, and con- 
ducted Miss Steele to Stone Hall. In the 
cheering for the Senior President, Miss 
Faith Talcott, the executive member from 
the class, was not forgotten. 



Senior Elections. 

At 4.15. on Wednesday. May 6, the class 
of 1904 held a class meeting for the elec- 
tion of their senior president, and for the 
election of a member from the class for the 
Executive Board of the Student Govern- 
ment Association About 5 o'clock the 
other classes began to assemble in Centre 
and on the second and third floor, eagorlv 
.waiting to cheer for the senior president. 

We waited a long time for the results of 
this election. We went to dinner and came 
back again: we sang songs, and did all we 
could to pass the \^eary time of waiting, 
and finally we were rewarded. About 
8 o'clock the whole junior class rushed to 
the railing on the third floor and yelled 
"Steele." Then everybody else clapped, 
and yelled "Steele" and the classes in 
turn cheered for "Madeline Steele, 1904 
Senior President." The class of 1904 then 
ranged up on either side the stairs, and 
Madeline Steele, Florence Hvitsinpillar, and 
Louise Htinter, marched down the steps. 



A Japanese Girl. 

One of the prettiest and most finished of 
Barnswallow entertainments was a two-act 
operetta, "A Japanese Gii"l," presented by 
members of the Sophomore Class, Saturday 
night. 

One of the great events in the life of a 
Japanese girl is her coming of age on her 
eighteenth birthday, and this festival, — 
the preparations for it and its celebration, 
— formed the background for many pretty 
scenes. Those especially worthy of praise 
were the opening chorus, "Sing 0-hay-o," 
— a joyous salutation, — " Lullaby," where 
the bodies of the singers swayed in perfect 
rhythm, and "Tip-toe Chorus." 

Though the operetta is not essentially 
comic, there are some amusing incidents, 
notably the sad plight of an English gov- 
erness, Miss Know-all, when the dainty 
Japanese ladies find her asleep. Miss 
Daniels as Miss Know-all, did some ex- 
cellent acting. 

Just before the Finale, " All Hail," 
there was a wonderfully graceful little 
dance. The music of the operetta is light 
and delicate with many suggestions of the 
Oriental. Both solo and chorus work 
were remarkably well done and gave evi- 
dence of faithful practice. 

After the curtain was dropped, the cast 
cheered for Rachel Pflaum, who is indeed 
to be congratulated on her very successful 
management, and then followed consider- 
able complimentary cheering between 1903 
and 1905. After an evening so thorough- 
ly enjoyable, we are sorrier than ever to 
realize that the Barnswallow entertain- 
ments are nearly over for another year. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Press of N. A. Lindscy A' Co., Boston. 



College IFlews. (3 I a 6 6 C 6 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents 
a \ear to resident subscribers; $1.00 per year to 
non-resident subscribers. 

All business correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to C. W. ROGERS. Business Editor COL- 
LEGE News, Wellesley, Mass. 



Editor-in-Chief, Carolyn P. Nelson, 1905. 
Associate Editor, Helen R. Norton, 1905. 
\ Literary Editors, 

Martha Male Shacl<ford, '96 Mabel Seagrave, 1905 

Mary Esther Chase, 95 Ellen Manchester, 1905 

Managing Editors 
Carrie M. Holt, 1903 Betsey M. Todd. 1903 



There .seems to be a misunderstanding 
on the part of some members of the College 
in regard to the appearance of the last 
issue of the College News on Wednesday. 
The editors wish to state that Wednesday 
is the regular day for the delivers^ of the 
News. During the past ye.ir it has .been 
somewhat irregular, coming out some- 
times on Wednesday, sometimes on Thurs- 
day. Owing to compl'cations arising 
from a change in the board, the News has, 
since the Eastei vacation, been late. 
ttntil the last number. The editors hoj)e 
that in the future it may always come out 
on tint". 

"'TliLrc shall he no distiu"hing noise 
during recitation hours in halls of ri'cita- 
tion .-' 

" In accordance with this rule all loud 
talking, laughing and stamjiing of feet in 
corridors of College Mall or other halls of 
recitation, during hours of recitation, shall 
be considered a deliberate violation of the 
rule and shall be dealt with accordingly." 

Evidently this notice has not been fully 
digested, for the racket in ColUge Mall 
corridors does not seem to diminish. We 
ought to be ashamed to have our attention 
called to a thing like this bv a Student Gov- 
ernment rule. It is something which mere 
courtesy to our instructors and fellow 
students should compel us to. Of course 
it is not a malicious spirit which impels a 
girl to whistle or sing rn her vvav past a 
recitation room. It is onlv carel-^ssnc-.ss. 



It's a FOWNES' 

That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



It is a fact that our Glasses combine 
the most accurate construction with 
perfect adjustment at a saving to you 
of from 10 to 20 per cent. Is this 
worth your consideration ? 

Pinkham «St Smith, 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS, 

288 Boylston Street, Boston. 



But then, this cai'elessness ought not to be. 
We are not no.isy boarding-school girls, 
we are college stttdents, with a definite aim 
and purpose, — the attainment of high 
scholarship. We all believe in atmos- 
pheres, and we belie\-e that better wcrk 
can be done in a scholarly atmosphere. 
An atmosphere pierced with shouts and 
stamping is not — seholarh- It is quite 
impos.sible for a student to concentrate 
her attention upon a lecture, when the 
trend of her thought is being constantly 
interrupted by noise in the corridor out- 
side. Let us remember that there is a 
time and a place for play, a time and a 
place for work, and let us endeavor with all 
our might and main to lower our voices 
and soften our step? in recitation h.iUs 
during hours of recitat.on. 



Christian Associations Elections. 

The results of the Christian Association 
elections for next year are as follows: 

President, Mary Eaton. 

Vice-President, Ade'e Ogdcn. 

Corresponding Secretary, Elizabeth 'I'av- 
lor. 

Treasurer, Mabel Emerson. 

Chairman General Aid Committee, 
Edith Moore. 

Chairman Missionary Committee, Miss 
Brcyfogle. 

Chairman ReIi.gious Meetings Com- 
mittee, Miss Moflctt. 

Chairman Social Committee, Anne Orr. 

Ch;.innan Bible Study Committee, Caro- 
line Soutter. 

Chairman Mission Study Committee, 
.\nnie I.ufi". 

Recording Secretary, Fai'h Sturte\ant. 




fpine (yandies- 

Delicious ice Cream Soda 

and Hot Chocolate 

SERVED AT OUR TABLE-S. 



ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS 

NOTMAN'S, 

384 Boylston St. and 3 Park St., Boston. 
Also 1286 Mass. Ave., Cambridge 

SPECIAL RATES TO WELLESLEY STUDENTS. 



Hayden Costume Co. 



2-43 Ti-emont Sti-eet, 



Boston 



A Full Ivine of Costumes al« 
^va^^s on hand for Plays* 
Fax\cy Dress Parties, Ftc. 

ESPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO PADDING 
COSTUMES FOR GENTLEMEN'S PARTS. 



GEO. n. D. LEGG, 

Produce Commission Merchant, 

Dealer in Poultry, Game, Smoked Tongues, 

Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Mutton, Lamb 

and Veal. 

No. 5 Basement Quincy Market, Boston. 

TELEPHOf^E COfJf/ECT/ONS. 




POlNrDT^X, 

SHOD /S'.2£2^ 

159 c;remont Street, JBostou. 



CHAFING DISH SPECIALTIES, 



The D. S. HcDonald Co. 

131 'Premont St., Boston. 



SAVES HOSIERY 

NEVER SLIPS, TEARS 
NOR UNFASTENS 

Every Pair 

Warranted 



146 Tremont Street, Boston. 




nail, 
2Sc. 



CUSHION 
BUTTOr 



HOSE 
SUPPORTER 

If your Dealer does not 
sell you this Supporter 
he does not sell the Best 

Every Clasp has the name 
Stamped on the Metal Loop 

GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, B 




COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

Satiirday. May i6, ,^20, P. M., Teachers' Registry Meeting. 

Address bv Miss McKeag. 

7.^0, P.M.. Tau Zeta Eosilon Studio Reception. 
Sunday. May 17, 11 , A.M., services in Houghton Memorial cha]-- 

e!. Sermon by Rev. James Grant of Watertown. 

7.30, P.M., address by Dr. Newman of South End House of 

Boston. 
Sundav, Mav 24, 11, A.M.. services in Houghton Memorial chap- 

e\. Sermon by Rev. William R. Hur'tington, D.D , of 

Grace Chiirch, New York City. 

7.30, P.M., vespers with suecial music. 
Mondav. Mav ?%, 7.30, P.M.. in College PlaU chapel, lecture by 

Mr. Curtis Guild under ausnices of the History Department. 

4-6, P.M.. a plav at the Bam by the Welleslcy Col'ege Settle- 
ment Association for the beneiit of Miss Stone's work in 

Kentuckv. 
Friday. May 29, 4.15, P.M., presentation of "Everyman" on the 

College Campus. 

8, P.M., presentation of "The Sad Shepherd" on the College 

Campus. 

coll ege"n otes. 

Miss Eh-a Young, president of the Alumn:'.: Associatior', spent 
a few days at the college last week. 

Tickets for "Everyman" and "The Sad Shepherd," which are 
tc be given Ma> ?.g, on the college grounds, are on sale at the Col- 
lege Bookstore. There are no reserved seats. The price for stu- 
dents is one dollar, for outsiders, one dollar and a half. 

Miss Helen .Abbot Merrill, Associate Professor of Mathemat- 
ics, who was studying last year in Germany, and is this year 
studying at Yale, vi,ited hereda^^t week. 

Miss Laura Reed, '01, has left the Philippines and will be here 
in time for Commencement. 



THE HONORA RY SC HOLARSHIPS. 

On Sat'.irday, May 9, the honorary scholarships for 1902-1903 
were read in Chapel. 

Class of 1903. Durant Scholars: Grace Edwards, Helen Lucas. 
Gertrude Schcipperle. 

Welle.sley College Scholars: S. Belle Ainslie, Louise W. Allen, 
Helene L. Buhlert. Mary H. Crombie, Flora A. Dobbin, Jessie S. 
Goodwin. Genevieve C. Hanna, Myrtle C. Hunt. Marjorie L. 
Nickerson, Annie R. Ripley, Belle W. Smith, Anne R. Torrence, 
Ruth Whitney. 

Class of 1904, Durant Scholars: A. Mildred Franklin. Abbie 
H. Newton, Marion B. Potter, Mary G. Riley, Minnie L. Whol- 
ean. Euphemia R. Worthington. 

Wellesley College Scholars: S. Louise Adams, Bfssie W. Allen, 
Elsie Appel. Martha N. Brooks. Jane L. Burbank. Cora L. But- 
ler, Louise B. Foster, Helen G. Fox, Gladys Gladding, Estelle 
C. Kramer, Eleanor P. Monroe, Clara S, More, Alice B. Phillips, 
Edna L. Taylor, Marion L. Townsend. 

FRE E PR ESS. 

1. 

That there was an unusual ainount of electicmeering previous 
to the late Student Government elections few students on the 
campus or off it are likely to cjuestion. That much of this elec- 
tioneering was of an indiscreet and undignilied character many 
of the most ardent electioneers rmy themselves, in cold blood, be 
willing to admit. Personal affection for a candidat.-^ is, of course, 
not the primary reason that should prompt one in working to se- 
cure her election; nor should it in any way be permitted to color 
one's presentation of her executive attributes ^o a person whose 
sole interest in her is as in a pr.->spect.ive head of the Student Gov- 
ernment .\ssociation — even when, as occasionally happens, such 
personal affection is grounded on the very quality that .one be- 
lieves pre-eminentlj' to distinguish her as fittest for the presiden- 
cy of that body. 

An unprejudiced observer must adinit that electioneering, by 
its conspieuousnes^:. and its marked display of enthu'-.iasm of a 



Tel. 611 Oxford, 



Special Prices to Parties, Fairs, Etc. 




Vienna Bakery and Restaurant. 

XaMes' Xuncbeon. ffinc Cbocolate and JBon=J3on6. 

181 & 183 Summer Street, 

BOSTON. 



•WE ARE PREPARED 

To meet the deroand of the 

Most Exclusive Trade 

in our 

NecKwear 

DEPARTMENT 



MISS M. F. FISK 

144 Tremont St 



New Department 
For I^adies and Misses 



street Costumes Evening AVrstps 

Street Coats and SKirts 
Driving Coats Oolf or Outing Suits 

THESE GARMENTS to be strictly tailor-made under 
the direction of Mr. Crapson, wlio understands thor- 
oughly the proper styles and up-to-date ideas. It will be 
in connection with our Shirt Waist Department, which 
we feel is sufficient guarantee to extend to you an invita- 
tion to call and see the New Spring Styles. Our New 
Models are Ready 

BotH Departxnezits Avill be tirkder MR.S. 

XR..AFXON'S Care, as usual 



NOYE5 BR05. 

•Washington (Sl> Summer Streets, 
BOSTON, U. S. A. 




F. M. PORTER, 

Plumber. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK 

llJct TiClatcv anJ Steam iHcatcra, 
Eicalcr in Stoves, IRangca, JHav^warc, 
Ipainto, ®il3, Etc. 
Wellesle>', IVlass. 



F. DIEHL & SON, 

Dealers in 

Coal, Wood, Hay & Grain, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Telephone No, 16-4. 



Ttie Wolpt Hill School for Girls, 

NATICK, MASS. 



Tuition and Board, $600.00 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow, Principals. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS— Continued. 



personal nature, overstepped the bounds of good sense and good 
taste. But because a number of students go to somewhat fool- 
ish extremes in their actions and expressions in following out 
their desire for the election of candidate who is thei: friend, it 
will hardly do to saj', that, all peisonal considerations removed, 
these same gir^s do not veasonably and conscientiously be- 
lieve that candidate the most deserving of election. It is 
easy to agree with a statement that the electioneering done by 
such girls was "open" and "systematic" — and it must further- 
more be acknowledged that while openness and system are to be 
commended in clean electioneering for a national or state govern- 
ment political campaign, they are, even in legitimate elec- 
tioneering, of questionable value in our smaller and necessarily 
more personal community. Electioneering of the personal tone 
described above should undoubtedly be condemned, but indis- 
criminately to term it "shameless" is tn make a somewhat dan- 
gerously imjustifiahle statement. 

It is tiTie that the writer of a Free Press article that appeared 
in the College New? for last week evidently had in mind, in her 
ccndcnmation of illegitim^ate electioneering, another element of 
the last "campaign" besides that of the existence of personal 
bias toward candidates. This element we are unable to discuss 
because we have not the data for doing so. Unlike the vmwise 
extreme of personal enthusiasm which was evident to a disinter- 
ested observer who walked the campus or the corridors on the 
day of election, the other objectionable feature, so stronglv em- 
phasized by the Free Press correspondent, was not evident. The 
statement that there was a "deliberate campaign with the object 
to accomplish elections not to the good of Wellesley College, but 
to the glory of private organizations, in other words, society elec- 
tioneering" is a charge cf so serious a nature that the writer 
could scarcely have been willing to make it ptiblic or "represen- 
tative members of the Faculty and Student Body" to approve it 
without the most substantial and convincing evidence to back it. 
It can easily be undert-tood that this evidence might have been of 
so personal a character as to make its publication a matter to be 
deplored, and it may have been supposed that certain general 
allusions to "substantiated particular fa,cts" and to "repeated 
testimony verifying suspicion " would be sufficient to bring to the 
mind of the individual voter definite specific instances that came 
within her own personal observrtion. If this has been accom- 
plished one could only welcome Ihe veil thrown over the charges. 
But as a inatter of fact these charges, as stated in the article re- 
ferred to, convey absolutely no delinite or specific suggestions to 
a large mmiber of earnest, thoughtful and totally disinterested 
participants in the election. That statements of so grave and 
comprehensive a character can be received by impartial and in- 
telligent persons with suqjrise and bewilderment should be a 
matter of concern to those who made such statements. The ad- 
visability of publishing an explanation sufficiently explii it to 
elucidate and render convincing to the unprejudiced these vasnie 
statements may .seem, under the circumstances. ver>' c|uestion- 
ablc; yet it is to be hop.ed that for the sake of candidates, so- 
cieties and fair-minded members of the Student Body the writer 
of the article referred to and the individuals who examined, dis- 
cussed and approved it will consider their responsibility in the 
matter. Ann.\ Price T/.tum, 'o-; 

II. 

The charges of open and intentional electioneering in the re- 
cent elections of the Student Government Association have raisei! 
several ducstions in our minds. One which has not yet been 
voiced in the Free Press is whether the Freshman class shouhl 
have so much influence in choosing the student heads of the col- 
lege. It is perhaps worth while to consider the ad\iL-ability of 
excluding or restricting the Freshman vote. 

In the course of her first year at college a student, and especial- 
Iv a village student, has small chance cf becoming acquainted 
with members of the Junior class who are eligible for the olhces of 
])resident and viee-])resident of the Student Government Assc- 



>^ For Summer Wear ^ 

A SELECT LINE OF 
IMPORTED LINENS AND ENGLISH KAHKI 

FOl; .SlMMKi; WEAR AND FOK 

RIDING HABITS 

Special Offer for T"WO "WEEKS ONLY 
AT THIRTY DOLLARS per Suit 



Lradies' 
Tailor 



Habit 
MaKer 



vSM YTH E. 

TKree Eig'Kty TKree Boylston St., Boston 



Miss EditH Gordon ^ValKer 
'OO, •will give ai\ entertain- 
ment at tHe Wellesley Town 
Hall, on Tuesday evening. 
May 26. Miss >Valker will 
render selections on tHe 
Harp, give readings and il- 
lustrate certain poems witH 
dancing. 



London Harness Co. 

IMPORTERS 

Pig=Skin and Leather Novelties 

from F»a.ris=Vienna. 

ENGLISH KIT BAGS & TRAVELLING REQUISITES 

l-lancJ=Sevvn Oloves. 
300 Devonshire Street, Boston 



OINEST Passenger Train service over 




r 



the only "Double Track" Route be- 
tween Boston, Albany and the west. 

A. S. MAINSOIN, 

General Passenger Agent. 



Brookline Riding Academy 

VILLAGE SO., BROOKLINE, Tel. 1098-3. 












TWO RINGS, g;3^?[|^feo 

Closes IRinij Hgoin Enlaigc6 25 ft. 
Open 8, A.A1. to lO, P.M. 

Ladies tuuglit either on Cross 
Saddle or Side Saddle. First class 
saddle horses to let. 

Finest accommodation for board- 
ing horses. 

Fifteen minutes from Park Sq., 
Boston. R. CUASEIN. 

Special Rates for Colleges, Schools 
and Teachers. 


•^Hl 


cafedes 
Hnvalides 


^^^^KSSS[J389f9(tWM 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS— Continued. 



ciatinn : nrr can she. in general, have gained such a broad view 
of college life and ideals as to enable^her to form an intelligent 
opinion on the merits and claims of candidates, and their ability 
to carry forward those ideals. It follows, then, simply from the 
nature cf the case, that her vote must be directed or infiiienced 
by members of the three upper classes. We may suppo.se that 
the motix'cs of one who seeks to enlighten the Fresbinan voter 
are of the highest kind; she may present fairly and fully the 
claims of each candidate; bhe may lay aside evei-v personal, 
class or society prejudice; and yet the fact remains that the 
Freshman is not voting independently. In general this ideal 
direction will not exist, for few of us can give advice independent 
of personal or other prejudices in matters which nearly concern 

US. 

V/hen foreigners enter this country we do not feel that they 
are prepared to vote at once, and native-bom citizens do not at- 
tain their majority for twent)'-one 3'ears. Is not a Freshman in 
the yiosition of a foreigner or a minor in college life' Again, 
onlv Alumna? of Wellesley of three years' standing may vote for 
the Alumnx Trustees of the college. They are given that length 
of time to accustom themselves to their new duties and respon- 
sibilities, and become acquamted with and judge for themselves 
the merits of the candidates. Is it too much to require the 
Freshmen to wait a year before taking part in the election of the 
President of the Stvident Government Association? Through 
their representation in the Executive and Advisory Bcardi of the 
Association they will have a voice in the management of affaiis, 
and can they not reasonably be expected to be as loyal to the 
president chosen by the three upper classes as if they them- 
selves had cast their votes under an upper class girl's advice? 

It is of course possible to try the method of lessening the im- 
portance of the Freshman vote. A system of rights based on 
the total mrmber in each class could be devised by which the 
votes of the three upper classes would count for more. But it 
would nevertheless be true that the Freshman vote was not inde- 
pendent; hence the opportunity for electioneering am.ong them 
would not be removed, while in a close clection__it wotild still be 
possible to make their vote turn the scale. 

Certainly s<'me remedy for the evils attendin.g the recent elec- 
tions should be sought for. The charges made are too serious to 
be "gnored; but their open and defnite character will help tn 
raise the standard of pviblic sentiment in regard to elections. 
Should no*- the question of removing the most fruitful source 
for this difticulty be carefully considered as well? 

An A-!.umn.\. 
III. 

Is this a time for charges of dishonorable conduct against each 
other? We are laying the foundation for the work of a new 
year; our "ship of state" hat sailed but a short distance, yet 
already seriovis danger threatens, net from without, but the 
gravest danger that can assail us. divisions within. 

Granted that there w.^s electioneering in the recent cam- 
paign, it seems to the writer that the extent and methods have 
been exaggerated, that blame has fallen where blame was not 
due, and that much of the so-called electioneering was fair, 
open and honorable discussion of candidates, advisable for the 
sake of wise election. Electioneering f^r personal ambition 
should be condemned, bttt electioneering with a desire to obtain 
the best candidate is a different thing. Each whisper cf dis- 
honorable motive against members of the college Icwers Stu- 
dent Government infthe eyes of the world; it misrepresents, 
too. the loyalty of the student body to one who is more than 
worthy cf our tribute of conlideuce, and into whose hands we 
gladly and proudly entrust Wellesley's honor for the coming 
year. ' ' E. M. D., 'o.'. 

IV. 
In a recent Free Press article in College News \'ery serious 
charges have been made which throw a large number of ijeople 
under the shadow of suspicion. The accusations of "corru]"'- 



LAMSON Si HUBBARD, 



HATTERS and FURRIERS for MEN and WOMEN, 



90 to 94 Bedford St. (Cor. Kingston) 
229 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



B. F. HOVEY & CO. 

[[Importers and Retailers of Dry Goods 



Dress Goods, Silks, Linens, Gar- 
ments, Underwear, Gloves, Laces, 



Ribb 



ons. 



RaeS AND FaRNISRINSS 

Por College "Rooms. 

BOSTON PARIS 

33 Summer and 42 ivon Streets. 12 Rue Ambroise Thomas 



Every Requisite for a 



Saints Xuncb 



at 



COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., 

55 to 6i Summer Street, 

( Only one block from Washington St.) 




1 per cent. 
Discount 



Shirtwaist 
Suits. 

Walking 



Covert Goats. 

I Neckwear. 
^^^^ Stocks, Collars 
and Cuffs. 
Linen, Lawn 
and Muslin. 
J Hand-made Work 
'€> a Specialty. 

158 Tremont St. 



COLLEGEN E W'S 



SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO. 



JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS, 



BOSTON 



FINE STATIONERY, UMBRELLAS, PARASOLS. 

WEDDING GIFTS. 

OFFICIAL MAKERS OF THE WELLESLEY SEAL PINS. 

FINE JEWELRY REPAIRING. 




CHOCOLATES 
SO and 60c per lt>. 

DELICIOUS— DAINTY-PURE. 

146 Washington St., ( 4th door North of Summer St. ) 



James Korntved, 

Ladies' anil Gents' Cuslom Tailor. 

Shaw Block, Room i, 

^WELLESLEY SQUARE. 

Special attention paid to pressing 
and cleaning. 

Edward E. Henry, D.M.D. 

(Grad. Harvard Univ, Dental School) 

Shattiick's Block, . Wellesley. 
Hours 9=12 and 2"5- 

MILLS & DEERING, 
Butter, Cheese pp Eggs, 

stalls: 22 and 24 Quincy Market. 
BOSTON. 

MARY L. MORAN, 
DressfnaH''??. 

Shaw Building, Wellesiey, Mass. 
latest paslpioijs, 



GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costume ■■ Parlors, 
17 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes tor i:)rivate llieiitricals 
and Costume parties. 

John A. Morgan St Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 

"Tom" Griffin. -"-".-.Uv 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all troins. 

Reliable Horses anil Carriages To Let. 

rersonal Attention I0 all orders 
for evening trains. Ortler bo.x at 
North Door of College Hall. 

KAGGAGK TIIANSFKBRKD. 

TELEPHONE 101-5. 



H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, Sta- 
tionery, Etc. 

Wright & Ditson's Sporting Goods 
Waban Block, Wellesley Sq. 

Miss E. M. Knowles, 
Ladies' Tailoring 

and Dressmaking, 

PARTRIDGE BLOCK, 
CENTRAL ST., WELLESLEY. 



FREE PRESS- Continued. 



tion," "dishonest campai.oriing," and "electioneering for a 
societv or persona! friend irrespective of her qualification," 
thoti.gh said to be ba.sed on substantiated facts, are given with- 
out any definite facts or proofs which might leave to those 
accused that fair chance of defending themselves which is al- 
ways considered the due of the narty accused. 

It is to the unfairness of making a public charge of so seriotis 
a nature withotit gi\"ing t-: the public the proofs bv which one 
mav judge for herself and of giving to the persons under such 
charge the righi of defending fheinselves. that we protest. We 
certainlv reenoriize that it is' lamentable that anything of a 
personal nature must com.c into College News, yet in view of the 
fact that it was deemed necessars- to bring forward such 
accusations, we believe it the right of both the person accused 
and of the public to demand definite facts. 

Tn our inability to find in College News the foundation of thi^ 
writer's statements, we have tried to follow up different tales 
prevalent in College, and again .tncl a.gnin it has been found that 
the blri:-kest of stories can be traced to the most innocent of 
sources. We have f.'^iled to find any account which could be 
sub.stantiated of any kind of "corruption" or "dishonest com- 
paigning " In the name of fairness .nnd justice, therefore, we 
ask that any substantiated proof of such action be brought 
forward. 

As *o the charge of " electioneerin.g for a oersonal or society 
friend irrespective of her tiualifications," there can be no one 
outside of C3ch individual girl herself who can know the moti"e 
for which she "electioneered" for a candidate. It is in no way 
possible for any outsider to judge of any .girl whether her 
motive was "to bring forward the good r|ualities of a girl with 
the intention of getting the best girl into the olfice" or whether 
lier aim was to Acct a "personal or society friend irrespective of 
her iiualillcations." Thcri. ;.rc girls on the side of each of the 
candid.-ites — both society and non-society girls — wh" freely 
admit that "electioneering" was carried on for all the candi- 
dates: yet each of these girls say — .ind the eharacters of the girls 
who say it are such as to coinmand belief — that she believes that 
all the "electioneering" that was cairicd on on her side was done 
with honorable motives and in r. legitimate fashion. How. 
then, can anyone, while feelinp that she herself has acted with 
•he best of niotives, dare to decide that .any other person, even 
though she has "electioneered" for another candidate, has done 
so with unworthy aims? . pRANOEa He'. FN Wap!!I-.n, 1110.3. 

V. 

It is only fair that the alumn.T readers of the Colle.ge News 
should know that there are two sides to this rpicstion of election- 
cei'ing. 

In Colle.ge further discuss'on seems unnecessary. The writer 
cannot -ay that she was non-partisan for she was — as she be- 
lie'es every lr^■^l member of Student Gov?mment should be- 
stron.ely in' favor uf one partiet-lar candidate. In the house in 
which she lives are re; resentatives of five societies, among thi'm 
and .".mong all the girls in the house the subject cf ''UcticMis was 
freely discussed. "Society intrigue" was never dreamed of. 

Whatever electioneering was done ontsidi' was not only le^Hli- 
mate but was done from a purely individual standi).)int taken 
because of the firm conviction of the individual that the crndi- 
date was the girl for the place. Electioneering was done for all 
three candidates by society and non-society girls; members of 
the same societies n'ere supportin.g different candidates, election- 
eering was carried on for the most part by .girls of other societies 
than those rcpnscnted liy the candidate for whom they 
worked, who had absolutely nothing to gain or .Ipse by the 
elections. . 

The author rerr-ets this discussion but she feels called upon to 
state that it was not for the attainment of clory for friend or 
socii tv that even indi\-iduals worked — much less societies ns a 
whole — but in lovaltv to the College and Student Go\-ornnient. 



H. L. LAWRENCE CO. 

Poultry, Wild Game, 

Stalls 46 & 48 Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON. 



Kathryn Vinal, 
Fashionable Dressmaker. 

EVENING DRESSES. 

GRADUATION GOWNS. 

Wellesley S(|iiare. 



Dr. f[\. 0. |Velso9, 

D 6 NTI S T 

I^oo/i) 4, U/aleott Buildip<}. 



HOLDEN'S STUDIO, 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected bj' Telephone. 

i^assius /T\. jHall, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



B. S. COLE, 

Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Poultry 
and Game, 

Wliolesillc and Uetiiil. 

Stalls 13 & 15 Fatieull Halt Market 

Tel. Connection. BOSTON 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats and Provisions. 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

J. TAILBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

LADIES' DESKS, 

MORRIS CHAIRS, 

Filled Screens, Jiiitnboo Ten 
Tables uml Bookshelves. 

College Souvenir China. 
CLELAND & UNDERWOOD, 

7 TO 13 W. CENTIIAL ST., NATICK. 
Free Delivery. 



John P. Squire & Sons, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

IPoi-ft, XaiO, Ibnms l"{ 3Gacon, 

21, 33 and 25 Faneuil Hall 
Market, BOSTON- , 

TEL. 52 BICHMOMD. , . ', 



We have done Collese 

>Vorlc for IS years 

People's Steam Laundry, 

F. L. CUPPLES, Prop. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNA NOTES. 



Trcv Day will occvr on Friday, June 5. The Tree Day 
Exercises ire not npen to the public. Admission to the grounds 
on Tree Dav will he by ticket issued only to foitner members of 
the Colletre. Any former member cf the College who wishes a 
ticket should apply to the Registrar, enclosinn; a stamped and 
addressed envelope. These tickets arc not transferable. 

Miss Marion L. Taylor, '05. teai-her of Gei-man at the Girls 
Academv. AlT-ianv, N. Y.. s.^ils on June 6 for Naples. After 
travel in Italv. Mis.- Taylor will devote some weeks to study in 
Gennany, returning in October to resvime her duties at the 
Academy. 

Miss Grace Loomis Hannum. 'gS, is t'.'achino German and 
Literature at Ca.'^enovia Seminary, Caxenovia, N. Y. 

Miss Capps, formerly of '95. is traveling in Furope. 

Miss Mary Esther Chase. 'q6, who has been ill with nervous 
prostration, is much improved in health. 

Mis:- Lydia Wilkins, '96. is teaching in TUgan, Mndanas. 
Philippine Islands. .- She spent her vacation, last summer, 
in Japan, and plans to visit China this summer. 

Miss Edith Whitloek, 'g6, holds a position in the Eye and Ear 
Infirmarj' at Portland, Maine. " 

Miss Charlotte Burnett, '96, is general tmderstud}- in Miss 
Marlowe's Company. 

Miss Amelia A. Hall, '85, has a poem "In Lighter Vein" in 
the May Century. 

The Women's University Club of the Citjf of New York was 
established in 1901 for the social welfare of college-bred wom.en. 
The club house at 13 E. 24th street was opened in November, 
igoi. It contains attractive .bed-i-ooms, assembly rooms and 
dining room. The facilities of the restaurant have proved to be 
particvdarly convenient for club members. The assembly 
rooms may be rented for the use of college or other social organi- 
zations. During the past two years, entertainments of a literary 
or hiusical character ha\-e been given at the club house and ha\'e 
been a means of pleasant social' intercourse for the many college 
women of New York. 

The present membership of the club is about six htmdred. The 
annual dues of r<?sident members are Sio.oo. Of non-resident 
members, .'^5.00. The initiation fee is Sro.oo. In applying for 
membership in the. club the. candidate's name shovild be pro- 
posed and seconded by club members in letters stating the 
candidate's r|ualification for membership, to the Chairman of the 
Com:nittee on Admissions (13 East Twentv-fourth street.) 



ENGAGEMENTS. 



The engagement is announced of Miss Bertha L. Sisson. 1900, 
to Mr. Alex Harper, Yale ShelTield School, 'gS, of Bristol, Con- 
nciGticut. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Grace L. Hannum, 'gS. 
to the Reverend Arthiir Cleveland Clarke. 



BIRTHS. 



April 26, 1903, at Chester, Massachusetts, a daughter, Olive 
Parkman, to Mrs. Clara Kecfe Gardner, '88. 

February, 1903, a daughter, Anna, to Louise Orton Caldwell, 
'99. 

TWO SPECIALTIES of Oar Own Manufacture : 

Silk Petticoats, and Neckwear 



OUR PETTTICOATS 

Are made from Mohair, Mercerized Italian Cloths, Moreen and .Silk.s, and 
can be fitted to the form at very slight extra expense. 

Our desir^ns are original and e.xclusive and new models are being constant- 
ly made up. 
'The same is, in large measure, true of our choice 

NECKWEAR 

StocKs, Xies> Jabots and Ascots, in Silk and 
I^inen and in Mercerized 'WasK Goods. 

We also carry a large assortment of irai^orteil 

TOP COLEARS 

Swiss Embroidered and Hemstitched. 



KNIGHTS' LINING STORE, 174 Tremont Street, 

. .NEAR TREMONT THEATRE. 




DOMINION LINE ^^II^Te'I.vice 

BOSTON TO LIVERPOOL("ia Queenstown 
Sailing from Boston on Wednesdays. 

MEDITERRANEAN SERVICE 

Boston to GIBRALTAR, NAPLES, GENOA 
and ALEXANDRIA, via AZORES, Sailing on 
Saturdays. For furtiier information call on or 
address 

RICHARDS, MILLS & CO., 
77-81 STATE ST REET, BOSTON. 



HOTEL TOURAINE, Boylston and Tremont Sts. 
PARKER HOUSE, School and Tremont Sts. 
YOUNG'S HOTEL, Court Street. 

— J. R. WHIPPLE & CO., BOSTON. 



X^ 



A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies' Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats, Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies' Negligee Gowns and Sacques, Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. ....... 

Shuman Corner, Washington and Summer Streets. 

LrUINCMEOIN. 

Nelson L.Martin OAK GROVE CREAMERY CO. 

445 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Everything we serve in our Dining Room is the choicest and best 
that can be bought, regardless of price. 

The Berkeley Hotel, 

Berkeley and Boylston Streets. 
Al o d e r n in Every Detail. 

Restaurant for Ladies, Entrance on Boylston Street. 
JOHN A. SHERLOCK. 

Standard Imperial Paper. 

CLOTH FINISH, 
BLUE, GEEE?*^ A^TD PEARL GRAY, 

l!)c LB. ENVELOPES 5c PACK. 

T R Y I T . 

HOOPER, LEWIS & CO., 

lOr FEDERAL STREET, BOSTOX 
STATIONERS. 



ESTABLISHED 1850 

SHATTUCK & JONES, 
RISH OR ALL KIINDS, 

NO. 128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, 
Telephone 1430, 14-37 Richmond. BOSTON. 

Madame May * Co. 



ELECTRO TONIC FACE TREATMENTS, 
MANICURE, PEDICURE, HAIR DRESS- 
ING, TOILET ARTICLES. 



15 Temple Place, Boston 



MOCHA AND JAVA COFFEE 
1 LB. AND 2 LB Cans. 



PREFERRED STOCK 

The Highest Grade Coffee. 

MARTIN L. HALLiSi CO., BOSTON 

STUt^TEVANT St HflLiEY, 

Beef and Supply Oo., 

38 and AG Faneuil Hall Market, 
Tel. 933 Riclimotid: BOSTON. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



Mrs. Sarah Bixby Smith. '94. Elva Yor.ng. '96, Mrs. Anne 

Bixtay Chamberlain. '97, Mary Capen.'gS, Mary Leavens, '01 

and Mary Hall. '02. were present at the regular meeting of the 

Agora on May 2d. The following pro.gram was presented; 

IMPROMPTU SPEECHES. 

I. Afltairs in Manchuria, Ethel B. Doak 

II. State of Affairs in Africa, Fanny Field 

III. Latest Developments in Turkey, Louise W. Allen 

The Development of Oroanized Labor. 
I. England from the Norman Conquest to the Beginning 

of the Nineteenth Centurv, Helen Brown 

IL England from the Nineteenth Century to the Present. 

Elizabeth Bass 
in. Nineteenth Century Conditions in Europe, 

Eli.vabeth E. Miller 

IV. America from the Sixteenth Centurv to the Present, 

Elizabeth C. Torrey 

At a re.gular meeting of. the- Phi Sigma Soicety held May 2, 
the following program was r^-ndered: 

Socialism O!' Willi.iV Morris. 

I. Life of William Morris, Socialist, Sai.ice Barrett 

Recitations from " Poem"; by the AVay." 
"A Dnath Song," " ' Ruth Younp- 

II. The Ethics of Work. 

"Art and Socialism," 

Evangeline I.ukens 
Recitation from "Poems Ijy the Way." 
"The Day is Coming," 

Eliza McCaguc 
.III. Morris's " Utopia," 

" News from Nowhere," 
"Dream of John Ball," 

Annie Bru .\lcC!ure 
IV. Socialistic Principles of William Morris. 
"Socialism: Its Growth and Outcome," 

Cora Butler 
Reading ol the " Rebound," Blanche Wenner 

At a meeting of Society Zeta Alpha, held Mr.\ ?. the following 
1 rogram was given; 

1. The Influence of the Church on Russ'an Life and Letters 

Miss M'^nroc 

2. Educational Movements in Russip.. 
,3. The Development of Russian Architc.-Uire. 

Painting, and Sculpture. 

4. The Musicians of Russia. 

5. Russian Poets and Poetry. 



Miss ClifTord 

^lis": Emmons 
Miss Darby 
Mi.'S Hires 



Theatrical Notes. 

Tremont Titeatrk — "Peggy from Paris." 

Colonial Theatre — ".\ Chinese Honeymoon." 

BosTo.v MusEiM — Charles Frohman's "The Unforeseen." 

Park Theatre — "A Rose o' Plymouth Town." 

Boston Theatre — "Sherlock Holmes." 

Hollis-street Theatre — Viola Allen in 'The Eternal City." 

MERRICK'S, 

COPT.EY SQUARK, A'B4K HACK HA V POST-OFFICE. 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Telephone 60S or 050. 



For Fastidious Women 



f 



HORSE-SHOW MILLINERY. 

The woman of taste ahv.iys finds .Style, Uislinclioii ami 
Individuality in our Millinery. 

Striking and Origfinal Desig^os of our own are now being; 

shown, also Imported Models. 

PICTURE MA.TS, 

JA.UINTV WAUKIING HATS. 



A. IN. COOK <Sr CO., 

Women's Hatters. 161 Tremont St., Boston 



Chickering 


Pianos 


The OLDEST /'/ AMERICA : 
THE BEST /•« the WORLD 

WRITE F O H CATALOGUE 


Chickering 

PIANOFORTE 

BOSTON, MASSA 


^ Sons 

MAKERS 
CHUSETTS 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

Tremont and Boylston Streets. 

Announce the SEASON'S OPENING of 

COTTON WAISTS 

and invite inspection of the following values, 



of Su|ieri(ir (luality Lawn, made with cluster tucking, rfN i p»/~j 
liem.stitclietl or iu jilain sliirt elTects, ^' ■'-''-' 

f>f pxtra fine Lawn — enibroiilery trimmed — in a variety of close 
and open-work jiatterns — pin-tucked back and yoke 
effect. 

Of I^awn, wit!) broad insertions of bow-knot em- 
broidery — yoke elTect, Kpaulet shoulder, 
Of Lawn, with Val. Lace and embroidery insertions, 
stock to match — new shape sleeve, 
Of LawD. with yoke effect — entire front diagonally 
lace trimmed, 

of Handkerchief Linen, tucked ami with tailored stock. 
Of Lawn, square yoke effect witli Cluny Lace insertions — 
also a variety of other Models, in heavy and light- djQ QO 
weight materials, Cpo.i7W 

of line imjiorted Kmbroideries — Cluny, Valenciennes au<l Irish 
Lace trimmed, with dainty stocks to <iiA ^C\ i <fcft QO 



$1.90 
$2.50 
$2.90 
$3.50 



match 



FURS STORED AND REPAIRED. 



THE BAILEY, 

BANKS & 

BIDDLE COIVIPANY, 

Philadelphia, 



Goldsmiths, Silversmiths 

and 

Art Stationers.